Rain picks wrong day, shows up on NTD

There's a never a good day to rain, and we've had way more than our share lately, but unfortunately it cut short some of the trail construction on National Trails Day this past Saturday.  A little rain never hurt anyone, but lightning sometimes does, so when the skies opened up and the bolts came closer, we decided to be better safe than sorry, rather than stay on the top of a prominent ridge next to some tall trees.

But thanks to the great turnout, we still made some great progress on the Mesa Trail.  We put the knowledge gained from the recent IMBA TCC visit to built some more great bench cut trail.

The cold rain made the NTD feast taste all the better.  Special thanks to Al and Jerrine for cooking up a great pulled pork, chili, and all the fixings lunch for our cold and drenched crew.

This leaves plenty to do to finish the trail.  We may consider scheduling some "hard corps" days in July and August like we used to do back in 1999 and 2000.  These are extra days we schedule on a "what the heck, why not" basis.  Because people usually still show up and great trail gets built!

So, you thinking of coming to a trail day...

So, you are thinking of coming out for a trail day, but you never been and don't want to look too much of a newbie…   Don't worry, here is a crash course.
(some of these items are my thoughts, others may feel differently)

Trail work - if you plan on coming out to do a trail work day, please be prepared, consider the following list.

1. gloves
2. work boots if possible
3. long pants,(really recommended) long sleeved shirt (bugs, prickers…)
4. snack and drink
5. bug spray
6. sun glasses, safety glasses
if you wear contacts, bring a case and fluid just in case
7. a pleasant attitude

You may think wearing shorts and gym shoes are best, but these may limit the type of work you will be able to do. Biking shoes with cleats can get easily ruined by shoveling a few buckets of dirt.  Many people wear shorts and shirts, but this is my list... so I'd suggest long pants, workboots.

THE TOOLS

The tools - if you don't know how to use them, ask… but here is a rather quick summary,and please watch and ask.  Be aware of the tools "circle of death"  the area around you that someone may get injured. It covers a few feet beyond the full reach of your arm with the tool in hand.  And Always ask permission before wanting to walk past another trail worker along the worksite.

McLeod- long handled tool for shaping tread, clearing out the organic matter to get down to the mineral soil. Has fingers on one side and usually a sharpened end on the other.  This should never be swung overhead.  This tool is very dangerous to user and nearby people. It is very capable, but can also be tiring if using for several hours.  Watch an experienced user to get the tips on it's use. The handle since it is round, is not for prying things up.


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Our insurance company has "strongly suggested" that we tell you that Mountain Biking can be dangerous. If you're visiting this site it's very likely that you're already aware that if you insist on having a good time by riding your mountain bike, eventually you will almost certainly fall down and collect any number of boo-boos, dings and injuries, serious or otherwise, but we have to tell you anyway.

Mountain Biking is a potentially hazardous activity carrying a significant risk of bodily injury and even death. Mountain biking should only be undertaken if you have a complete awareness of these risks. You can reduce the level of risk by wearing a helmet and by riding within your own skill level.